BTG Case Study

The Challenge

From our graphic designer, Caitlin Holden,

“When I came to work for BTG, one of the first things they told me was, ‘we need a new website.’ In fact, part of my interview had been to look at the site and assess what changes it needed, if any. It seemed a loaded question, and it was meant to be, but without knowing that they were going to ask this of me, I had already marked several aspects I believed could use improvement. My response – commenting to some inconsistent design elements, need for a stronger branding voice, and information architecture arrangement – was one of the points that netted me an offer with the agency.”

New BTG business cards

NEW LOGO

New BTG website

NEW WEBSITE

A Complete Company Rebrand

Our logo design process generally involves a lot of discovery at first, discussing existing branding and why it doesn’t work for the client, then gathering details about what they would like to see elements of (colors, font types, design variances, etc). Our designer sketches for a few hours and then begins taking the best design ideas into Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator.

Some of the Initial Logo Design Concepts

I chose the image of the rocket to focus on because BTG has a strong kinship to the concept of childlike vivaciousness wherein the individual never loses their ability to dream big. During our initial discovery phase, the company’s leadership team was particularly drawn to photos of business executives wearing rocket packs or kids in similar professional attire strapping on their own booster packs.

BTG logo concept 1
BTG logo concept 2
BTG logo concept 3
BTG logo concept 4

Creating the Final Product

While the rockets were all well and good, and the company leadership loved the playful attitude that was mixing into their logo concepts, they could never shake the feeling of this one image of a boy in a business suit with his rocket pack ready to blast off was exactly the embodiment of BTG. The problem was that the image they were so sold on had a copyrighting contract that forbade the manipulation we would need to do to use it in any kind of logo branding.

The solution? We would stage our own photo shoot using my DSLR cameras and light rigging equipment. Our design team did a quick round of shooting with one of our coworker’s sons right in the BTG office. The product of which would be used to create the logo the company now uses to this day.

All of the final logo concepts are finished out in Adobe Illustrator so that they are fully print ready for a professional shop to use on business cards, full-length panel banners, and advertising. We’re very proud of how it turned out, and the executive team of BTG was thrilled with the final product as well.

The photo that was used for the final logo made it into the website design as well in the main hero banner on the home page. The colors in the photo inspired the color pallet used throughout the company branding packets. We chose Bebas Neue as the primary branding font for its tight-knit lettering and modern, humanist, sans-serif boldness.

Photo of rocket boy
BTG logo in the makingFinal BTG logo